3D printing often seems like one of many esoteric scientific inventions that are elusive to everyone, especially students — inaccessible and apparently useless when kids are still struggling through geometry. After all, it’s difficult to imagine how 3D printing could help students memorize theorems. But the 3Doodler aims to change that.

This 3D printing pen doesn’t require excessive technical knowledge or scientific abilities. In fact, it’s quite the opposite: the 3Doodler is meant to be “affordable as well as fun,” encouraging students to engage with 3D printing technology without being hindered by a lack of experience. It’s easy to use and comes in several different designs — 3Doodler Start, 3Doodler Create, and 3Doodler Pro, each of which has a different style catered to a specific audience.

An easy-to-use 3D printing pen bridges the gap between theoretical and concrete. In the classroom, students all too frequently end up memorizing terms and concepts without any real understanding of what they’re committing to memory. But the 3Doodler allows students to model what they’re learning and see the concepts unfold before them. Geometry theorems are suddenly more than just a slew of math vocabulary terms; instead, they can be visualized using models that students create themselves, ensuring actual learning and absorbing instead of mindless memorization.

3Doodler has a rapidly growing online database of free lesson plans for teachers to implement in conjunction with the use of the 3Doodler pen. There are currently eight different curriculums online, each of which comes with a set of lesson plans. The engineering and design curriculum, for example, contains lesson plans for students to build a model roller coaster for a marble to roll down and to build a bridge of their own design. This is meant to help students grasp concepts that may otherwise elude them — the basics behind potential and kinetic energy. These concepts are much easier to understand once you’ve seen them in action from something you’ve created yourself. The design challenges curriculum contains 21 different designs for students to attempt to recreate with 3Doodler while applying math and engineering concepts.

In a school system where courses tend to get tedious and abstract, 3Doodler brings a bit of creativity and hands-on learning to the classroom. The concept of understanding by doing is reflected in every creation, whether it’s a coin purse or a mathematical model (and with this pen, both and anything in between are possible). With so many possibilities, as 3Doodler asks, “What will you create?”

To learn more about the 3Doodler, visit the3doodler.com. To listen to the entire interview with Leah Wyman, check out the full podcast episode.